Tag Archives: food

I Blame Obesity

Obesity…it’s not personal; it is a disease. For every new Oreo cookie on the market, there is a new weight loss diet or food, proving the disease is falsely medicated.

Shouldn’t that put the odds at a even keel?

It doesn’t appear to be working; but it’s not our faults, right?

When I was growing up, my mother taught my family that it was always someone else’s fault.

If it was bad weather, blame the weatherman. If they came out with a delicious new food, blame the food company.

There was always a way to find solace in blaming others.

Now that I am older and spent the last three years surrounded by every weight loss and health guru around, I have changed my position.

I find that if I stop taking the time to blame others for what has happened, I have at least the fighting chance to change things.

It’s a frighting thought for some, since it is so much easier to blame others whether they are right or wrong.

After being in a terrible truck accident, I spent three years in unbearable pain and blaming the truck for it..

While of course in some ways this is true, what I did with the situation was the most important. I needed to be proactive to help myself. I needed to take control.

I would have to deal with the pain for the rest of my life. There would certainly be different ways I could take to try and lesson the pain but it will always be there.

Normally, I would eat food to comfort me and just complain about what happened. I ate the candy because the truck accident aftermath MADE me…

Now I refuse to not take responsibility for my choices of how I react to my pain. I finally realize that I am the only one who can take proper action to stop the damage. I need to be proactive to help myself.

I have to make the first step towards helping myself. I don’t want anyone else to blame. Sure it isn’t personal, it’s a disease… but I can stop being the victim.

I know it is scary, but there is hope out there.

 

Is Miss Piggy Promoting Obesity?

You must think I am crazy, but there is a level of seriousness to it.

Miss Piggy is one of the most beloved characters within the crew of Muppets… but she certainly has a weight problem.

The audience can see her as a prototype of the overweight people they like to make fun of. Yet nobody behind the show has done anything to counter that.

I give credit to team Miss Piggy and Kermit the Frog. They don’t make fun of the difference in size there. Size doesn’t matter in this case.

Still I question the reasoning behind Miss Piggy being overbearing and loud. Is it because she is overweight?

In all seriousness though, if you look at many of todays animated characters, they are certainly all suffering from an uncontrolled eating problem.

Surely the Cookie Monster changed his ways to promote his veggies; but when we see just a picture of the blue creature, we immediately associate a chocolate chip cookie being devoured and start to perhaps crave one ourselves.

It is time that we control what goes into our mouth and take responsibility. It is time to not stereotype. It is time to promote health along with a healthy image.

If not, I guess we can just cook Miss Piggy for a pig roast and see how the kids react.

Here’s The Skinny On Shopping, Part 1.

A Special Guest Blog By: Courtney Mueller, Co-Producer of “Finding Thin”

I love shopping. Shopping can is sometimes little addiction for me in fact.

Heading over to the department stores to check out the latest fashions and perhaps treat myself to a new shirt or pair of pants is both an adrenaline rush and a release for me. It truly is retail therapy.

But lately my therapy sessions are ending poorly.

It feels as if clothing designers are unaware or uninspired by the realistic size of the average American woman.

I’m a real woman with curves. I’m not a twig, not obese- just
regular when it comes to size. But when I’m trying clothes on, I
feel as if I’m squeezing into what my normal size should be. I’m not trying to fit into a smaller size for the vanity of a tag with a smaller number; I’m just constantly battling my standard sizes thinning down.

I wonder what Michael Kors or Diane von Furstenberg would do if they traveled the same locations as “Finding Thin” and really took note at what Americans really look like. Not everyone is a size two… let alone a size zero (what I refer to as “size non-existent”). The average American woman can’t squeeze into the unrealistic expectations that clothing designers create…

and I can assure you that she doesn’t feel beautiful when she tries.

Of course designers design for all sizes, but as soon as we reach a
select size we go from model material to plus-size clothing. There’s a reason why the racks are always full of smalls and extra smalls; the larger sizes are selling out.

Dear Designers-If all the larger sizes sell out first, doesn’t that give you an indication of what the public wants?

As for me, where is the regular? Why is there no in between?

I think everyone should occasionally indulge a little retail therapy.

Go ahead and buy that new shirt or skirt to show off whatever you are
proud of, even at that “regularly plus size”.

Maybe I need a new form of therapy.

Cele-cake.

A Special Guest Blog By: Courtney Mueller, Co-Producer of “Finding Thin”

Another milestone happened in my life; Sunday I turned 25 years old. My quarter life crisis. Naturally I celebrated the entire Memorial Day weekend surrounded by friends and family. The parties varied with the people, location, and overall birthday feel, but there was one particular element that was present in every event… cake.

For me, it’s not a birthday until there’s birthday cake. The birthday song followed by making a wish while blowing out the candles inevitably turns into slicing into the first (and biggest) piece of cake to devour. It’s part of the tradition, it’s the birthday food, it’s the celebratory meal.

And regardless of the caloric count, we always justify our poor food choices “because it’s a special occasion”.

Valentine’s Day chocolate, summer barbeques, Halloween candy, Thanksgiving stuffing, and Christmas… a little-or a lotta- bit of everything. Food is a part of our journey and the unhealthy choices is the highway we use to take.

Food is not only part of our culture, but it is often a reward.

Get a promotion at work? Go out to dinner.

Breakup with a boyfriend? Put your face in a pint of ice cream.

Turn a year older? Let ’em eat cake.

While I don’t think giving your sweetheart Tofu candy is going to be the up and coming tradition, I do think better or (gasp) healthier choices can be made when celebrating.

Make your health “a special occasion” everyday.

When Food Doesn’t Take The Pain Away Anymore

Almost three years ago I began the quest for “Finding Thin.”

During my quest to find thin, I started to gain even more weight.
Traveling all around the country interviewing Jillian Michaels, Bob
Harper, Tony Horton and more, was extremely stressful and offered very
few healthy eating opportunities throughout the way.

In truth, I used the stress as an excuse that in turn failed my body,
my health, and overall, myself. Emotional eating has interrupted any
successful weight loss for as long as I’ve ever known.

Last week I lost my beloved Pug and it was devastating. This was the
last of my dogs and the loss of two in a month or so time.
Barry Roskin Blake's Pug sleeping on the couch
My world was completely torn apart. Life didn’t feel right, even in my
own bed where I’ve been barely fighting off sleepless nights. Any
mention of my dog broke me into a million little pieces.

In the past, I’d usually turn to food to ease my pain, but this time
it just didn’t feel right.
It was as if someone put some sort of mind trap in me and I could not
reach for the food.
Suddenly there were just a few poor food choices…but I didn’t even
care. I believe that I even lost weight.

Whether or not this is because I feel so empty inside or not, I am not
sure. Though the one thing I know is that over the last couple of
months, I have felt very different when it came to emotions and
eating. I wasn’t even trying for weight loss and yet it seemed to be
coming naturally.

There is still internal pain that I have to get through, but there is
also that feeling of success for being able to deal with something as
devastating as this in such a different way.

I guess the point that I am trying to make is that even in the darkest
hours, there is still hope out there.

Healthy Kitchen to Healthy Living

This is a guest post by Chris Steurer

How many times have you walked to fridge and looked inside to see it loaded with a variety of food options and still thought to yourself; “There is nothing to eat”? Generally after that we move on to the cupboards or the pantry and think the same thing. After all of the food frustration many tend to give up and grab an unhealthy snack from the vending machine, nearest corner store, or even the secret stash laying in that tiny little cupboard.

Staying home and eating in is one of the easiest and best ways to ensure that we are eating healthy and staying on track with our diet because we are in control of what we eat. However, it is so easy to fall victim to the cycle of eating unhealthy because of the way we often keep unnecessary and unhealthy food items at the forefront in our homes.

a man sitting on near the sink in his messy kitchen that is littered with dirty dishes and trash

How organized do you keep your kitchen?

We can help correct this by reorganizing our kitchens for healthier choices. To do this, we need to reorganize two main categories of our kitchens; the food and the eating utensils.

Food

Take a look at what your daily eating habits consist of and compare it to how accessible those food items are in your kitchen. Do you eat a lot of candy when you come home from work? Is that because you keep a candy dish sitting out? Candy is an easy choice when it is sitting in an inviting bowl on the counter right when you walk in the door. The proximity, location, and ease of access of the food in our homes can drastically effect what we eat, but it can also help us create new, smarter eating habits. If you try placing a bowl of fresh fruits on your counter where that candy bowl used to b, I bet you would be eating healthier right now.

a woman snacking on lots of junk food at her kitchen table

How easy is it to find the junk food inside of your kitchen?

Take into consideration where your other food items are placed in your kitchen. What food do you have sitting in your fridge door? What is right in front on the main shelf of your cabinet or pantry? These items are often the ones we choose the most because they are simply right in front us and seem to be an easy choice to make. This is why you should make sure that you strategically place the healthy foods in prime locations like this; more often then not you will naturally make the healthier food choice when you check your food stash. Make sure these food items are always in your sight and that they are easy to reach for when you want a quick snack or a healthy, tasty meal. Move all of the unhealthy snack items to the back of the shelf where they can hide behind your good food choices, or get rid of them entirely!

Kitchen Utensils

Do you use different kitchen utensils and cooking items when you eat healthy versus when you eat unhealthy? Generally when I’m eating unhealthy I only use the toaster or the microwave and some dishes. When I eat healthy food items, I am much more likely to use all of my other cooking accessories like the oven/stove, pots and pans, spatulas, strainers, and so on. Knowing this, I can create a more inspiring environment in my kitchen by placing these cooking utensils out so that they are more dominant in my kitchen then even the microwave or toaster.

Organize for Success

Reorganizing your kitchen can truly create a more healthy eating environment. Keep those unhealthy food items out of sight and they will stay out of your mind. Place the healthy food choices up front so that they become the obvious choice for food and sticking to your health and eating goals can become a lot simpler.

Do you have any tips on how you organize your kitchen or food for healthier habits? Post a comment below and let us know!

Emotional Eating

Dr. Judith S. Beck

This is a guest post by Judith S. Beck, Ph.D., author of “The Beck Diet Solution: Train Your Brain to Think Like a Thin Person” and President of Beck Institute for Cognitive Therapy and Research.

Chronic dieters often have beliefs about emotional distress and eating that interfere with losing weight or keeping it off. They express the ideas in the following ways: “If I’m upset, the only way I can calm down is by eating.” “If I’m upset, I deserve to eat.”

Woman Eating to much food while a man stands behind her while condemning her for her actions

Are you an emotional eater?

To address the first idea, I ask dieters about people they know who don’t have a weight problem. What do they do when they’re upset? Dieters frequently feel stymied–they simply don’t know. After polling hundreds of people, I’ve found that people who don’t struggle with their weight do lots of things when they’re upset: they try to solve the problem that is leading to distress, call a friend, take a walk, tolerate the feeling and return to whatever they were doing, practice relaxation or mindfulness exercises–or they distract themselves (surf the web, write emails, play a video game, do a puzzle, listen to soothing music). This group has a different idea about emotional distress: that it is temporary, normal, tolerable, and will diminish.

To address the second idea, “If I’m upset, I deserve to eat,” I get across the message that dieters deserve to feel better but that eating will only give them temporary relief. Once the food is gone, they’ll still have the initial problem that led to distress plus they’ll feel badly about having overeaten. I help them see that they have a choice: They can eat whenever they’re upset (and fail to lose weight or keep it off) or they can tolerate their distress or actively work toward reducing their distress in other ways (which greatly increases the probability that they will lose weight and maintain their weight loss).

I then work with dieters to create a list of compelling activities they can engage in when they’re upset and they quickly find out that they can self soothe in other ways. Many of these activities are described in the newsletters and blogs at www.beckdietsolution.org.